Reverse Discrimination 


A national leader in the struggle to ensure constitutional equal protection, SLF continues to wage court battles to end illegal race- and gender-preference programs and replace them with legal, productive, corruption-free affirmative action programs. Since 1989, when SLF participated in the landmark City of Richmond v. Croson U.S. Supreme Court decision which established a strict standard of review for affirmative action set-aside programs, we have been at the forefront of every major legal battle since – and we continue to win. From 1992’s U.S. Supreme Court decision in AGC of NE Florida v. City of Jacksonville to eliminating illegal set-aside programs in the City of Atlanta School District, the City of Nashville School District, the DeKalb County, Georgia School District and DeKalb County, Georgia, SLF takes on the tough cases – sometimes under tremendous attack by governments – in order to protect individuals against government-sponsored discrimination. 

Consider recent efforts in a challenge against the City of Atlanta’s Minority and Female Business Enterprise (MFBE) program, which mandates that 34 percent of all public contracts must be awarded based on race or gender. Keep in mind that no race-based preference or set-aside program has survived court scrutiny anywhere in America since the landmark Croson case in 1989 – and in June 2001, after two years of struggle, the program is ended by court order. We will continue to challenge illegal and discriminatory government programs in our ongoing battle against overreaching government power over the lives of individuals.  

 

Relevant Articles:

1/3/13 - VOTING RIGHTS ACT - SECT. V REAUTHORIZATION UNCONSTITUTIONAL?  U.S. SUPREME COURT REVIEWS 2006 CONGRESSIONAL REAUTHORIZATION OF SECT. V IN SHELBY COUNTY, AL v. ERIC HOLDER, et al.

In 2006, Congress reauthorized Sect. V of the Voting Rights Act using the controversial pre-existing coverage formula found in Sect. IV B of the Act - which, as was laid out by the high court in a 2009 decision, continues to give the federal government powerful oversight over many state and local jurisdictions in the United States despite profound evidence that past discrimination against minorities in voting no longer exists.  SLF, whose brief was cited three times in the 2009 decision by Justice Clarence Thomas, submits an amicus curiae brief in this important case, which will be heard this Spring...

Click here to read the brief

 

10/8/12 - U.S. SUPREME COURT EXAMINES "CLASSROOM DIVERSITY" RACE-BASED  SCHOOL ADMISSIONS IN FISHER v. UT-AUSTIN, et al.

 

Race-based school admissions at the University of Texas-Austin - a program designed to ensure "classroom diversity" rather than student body diversity generally - is the latest in a long line of constitutional race-based government programs that have fallen under court scrutiny.  The Supreme Court of the United States hears oral arguments this week in what legal analysts believe will be a landmark decision.  Southeastern Legal Foundation, participating as amicus in the appeal (Fisher v. UT-Austin, et al.), points out the fallacies of "trendy" programs that stretch the constitutional limits against racial distinctions by governments in the following article published on Oct. 8, 2012 in The Daily Report, Georgia's daily legal newspaper.

Click here to read more...

6/22/2009 - U.S. SUPREME COURT - SECT. V OF VOTING RIGHTS ACT "RAISES SERIOUS CONSTITUTIONAL CONCERNS"

SLF's friend of the court brief cited three times by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas - see how U.S. Supreme Court decides Voting Rights Act case in one of the most important decisions this year -

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12/19/2008 - HAWAII LAND TRUST BELONGS TO ALL HAWAIIANS, NOT JUST ONE RACIAL GROUP: APPEAL TO U.S. SUPREME COURT

SLF and the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii file a friend of the court brief the U.S. Supreme Court seeking relief from the decades-long practice by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs of distributing millions of public dollars to a single ethnic group - at the expense of the general public - see more inside -

Click to read more ...